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glsnake

the glsnake assimilation project

The glsnake mission: glsnake on every desktop.

GLSNAKE IN THE NEWS

http://marc.theaimsgroup.com/?l=fedora-list&m=107039145306375&w=2

http://lists.slug.org.au/archives/slug-chat/2003/12/msg00003.html

http://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic.php?t=155097

https://bugzilla.redhat.com/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=129335



If the above URLs aren't clear enough, glsnake is an imitation of Rubiks' Snake. The snake is made up of 24 triangular prisms (half-cubes) connected on the square faces by a rotational joint. The snake may be rotated and manipulated into a variety of shapes.

"I think a lot of the basis of the open source movement comes from procrastinating students."
        -- Andrew Tridgell

glsnake was written originally by Andrew Bennetts and Peter Aylett for the Allegro graphics library. Later, Jamie Wilkinson appeared and ported the code to use OpenGL. The code has gradually been improved over the months following.

Currently, glsnake has an interactive mode where you can create your own models, colour highlighting of different model classes, as well as mouse support.

It also has been ported to XScreenSaver. The screensaver version is non-interactive, but does attempt to load locally created models made with the interactive toy version.

Controls

Download

glsnake is available to you all under the GNU General Public License.

The source code is available from GitHub. The latest stable release can be downloaded from here.

Thanks to Peter Aylett there are also some Windows binaries: an MSI installer without Windows Installer files (544kB) and a Setup file with Windows Installer files (3,782kB). Try the MSI first, and if that doesn't work then try the other one.

Also...

Send any patches or suggestions to Jamie Wilkinson